Science Communication for Societal Impact

Online, available on Zoom

14 – 17 September 2021

To generate effective impact, it is imperative to consider how science is communicated, how science is perceived,whether research reaches the appropriate and relevant audience, and whether the message is understood andtrusted. It is coming to attention that successful communication of science can play an integral role in drivingimpact, such as through fostering curiosity, trust, and acceptance of scientific advancements in the general public,and through engaging with wider communities, beneficiaries and end-users, and public and private sectors to coproduceknowledge. Due to the need for Science Communicators to contribute to the societal impact of scientificresearch, this course will deepen your understanding of how science communication can be performed in a way it will reach users of scientific research in society, in addition to the general public.

Innovative and well-substantiated methods of mission-oriented science communication can offer a myriad of benefits to society; pathways through which science communication can offer impact include: government (evidence-informed policy making),  business (science marketing), or through media (science broadcasting), to name a few. With these possible pathways and the variety of target groups reached, having an understanding of communicating scientific knowledge to a wide range of audiences, including those without an academic or scientific background, in a way that is meaningful and credible to them is of utmost importance. It is additionally significant that research is not misinterpreted by users, which can happen when certain data or knowledge is perceived to support the goals of one organisation or party.

In the past years, science communication has advanced from one-way communication to two-way dialogue and engagement with the broader public. Reciprocal approaches of  connecting with the public has hence emerged in the initiative of public engagement. With the growing “Open Science” movement especially, multiple additional roads are paved to sustain the transfer of scientific knowledge to society. This course will focus on developments that go with it, such as new positions and professions, librarians taking up new roles, impact professionals exploring dissemination strategies and university communicators trying to reach new societal goals. The significance of communicating science seems indisputable, yet sharing the research process and outcomes with societal stakeholders is not per definition central to the routine of academic researchers, and often lacks programme and structure. Therefore AESIS brings together professionals and stakeholders in the field of impact and science communication, in order to support the development of new goals, professions and tasks in the interface between science and society.


For three days, experts involved in the field of Science Communication will share their expertise and foster interactive discussions on topics such as:

  • How can knowledge exchange benefit from better communication strategies
  • How to connect stakeholders and remain impartial and trustworthy
  • The role of intermediaries and social media
  • How to combine marketing capabilities and communication strategies
  • Pitfalls and challenges relating to how open science contributes to innovation and societal impact
Terms & costs Register

Partners

Confirmed trainers

Anna Maria Fleetwood

Anna Maria Fleetwood

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Cissi Askwall

Cissi Askwall

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Dariusz Aksamit

Dariusz Aksamit

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Eric Jensen

Eric Jensen

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Ger Hanley

Ger Hanley

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Paul Manners

Paul Manners

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Locations

Online

Zoom

Traveling to the conference location